Want That Font—wanted fonts and typographic niceties (by Mark)

Via typetoken—

Vanité is a sans-serif for Vanity Fair France. Its shapes recall the classic elegance of the twenties and thirties. Some spiky details are directly taken from the logotype and evoke the journalistic tone of the magazine. Many letters with alternate designs or width allow for a quick typesetting of mini-logotypes. Art direction Yorgo Tloupas for Vanity Fair France, assistance Yohanna My Nguyen.

— Jean-Baptiste Levée’s Vanité. Lovely, sharp ‘n’ sexy—I believe this was the type Gretel used in their Vanity Fair animation?
Via typetoken—

Vanité is a sans-serif for Vanity Fair France. Its shapes recall the classic elegance of the twenties and thirties. Some spiky details are directly taken from the logotype and evoke the journalistic tone of the magazine. Many letters with alternate designs or width allow for a quick typesetting of mini-logotypes. Art direction Yorgo Tloupas for Vanity Fair France, assistance Yohanna My Nguyen.

— Jean-Baptiste Levée’s Vanité. Lovely, sharp ‘n’ sexy—I believe this was the type Gretel used in their Vanity Fair animation?
Via typetoken—

Vanité is a sans-serif for Vanity Fair France. Its shapes recall the classic elegance of the twenties and thirties. Some spiky details are directly taken from the logotype and evoke the journalistic tone of the magazine. Many letters with alternate designs or width allow for a quick typesetting of mini-logotypes. Art direction Yorgo Tloupas for Vanity Fair France, assistance Yohanna My Nguyen.

— Jean-Baptiste Levée’s Vanité. Lovely, sharp ‘n’ sexy—I believe this was the type Gretel used in their Vanity Fair animation?
Via typetoken—

Vanité is a sans-serif for Vanity Fair France. Its shapes recall the classic elegance of the twenties and thirties. Some spiky details are directly taken from the logotype and evoke the journalistic tone of the magazine. Many letters with alternate designs or width allow for a quick typesetting of mini-logotypes. Art direction Yorgo Tloupas for Vanity Fair France, assistance Yohanna My Nguyen.

— Jean-Baptiste Levée’s Vanité. Lovely, sharp ‘n’ sexy—I believe this was the type Gretel used in their Vanity Fair animation?
Via typetoken—

Vanité is a sans-serif for Vanity Fair France. Its shapes recall the classic elegance of the twenties and thirties. Some spiky details are directly taken from the logotype and evoke the journalistic tone of the magazine. Many letters with alternate designs or width allow for a quick typesetting of mini-logotypes. Art direction Yorgo Tloupas for Vanity Fair France, assistance Yohanna My Nguyen.

— Jean-Baptiste Levée’s Vanité. Lovely, sharp ‘n’ sexy—I believe this was the type Gretel used in their Vanity Fair animation?
Via typetoken—

Vanité is a sans-serif for Vanity Fair France. Its shapes recall the classic elegance of the twenties and thirties. Some spiky details are directly taken from the logotype and evoke the journalistic tone of the magazine. Many letters with alternate designs or width allow for a quick typesetting of mini-logotypes. Art direction Yorgo Tloupas for Vanity Fair France, assistance Yohanna My Nguyen.

— Jean-Baptiste Levée’s Vanité. Lovely, sharp ‘n’ sexy—I believe this was the type Gretel used in their Vanity Fair animation?
Via typetoken—

Vanité is a sans-serif for Vanity Fair France. Its shapes recall the classic elegance of the twenties and thirties. Some spiky details are directly taken from the logotype and evoke the journalistic tone of the magazine. Many letters with alternate designs or width allow for a quick typesetting of mini-logotypes. Art direction Yorgo Tloupas for Vanity Fair France, assistance Yohanna My Nguyen.

— Jean-Baptiste Levée’s Vanité. Lovely, sharp ‘n’ sexy—I believe this was the type Gretel used in their Vanity Fair animation?

Via typetoken—

Vanité is a sans-serif for Vanity Fair France. Its shapes recall the classic elegance of the twenties and thirties. Some spiky details are directly taken from the logotype and evoke the journalistic tone of the magazine. Many letters with alternate designs or width allow for a quick typesetting of mini-logotypes. Art direction Yorgo Tloupas for Vanity Fair France, assistance Yohanna My Nguyen.

— Jean-Baptiste Levée’s Vanité. Lovely, sharp ‘n’ sexy—I believe this was the type Gretel used in their Vanity Fair animation?

  1. wantthatfont posted this
Running on The Default Network
by Boyce. Curated by Mark Stuckert.